Changes to Property - Managing Property

Cannibalization

What is cannibalization?
Cannibalization is the removal of serviceable components or parts from otherwise unserviceable Government property. Unserviceable property at NIH is Government property that is in "Salvage" condition (Condition Code X). Salvage Condition (Condition Code X) property is property that has some value in excess of its basic material content, but repair or rehabilitation use for the originally intended purpose is clearly impractical. Repairs for any use would exceed 65 percent of the original acquisition cost.

How can cannibalization be advantageous?
Appropriate cannibalization of federal personal property can be advantageous to the Government by reducing the need for new procurement, maximizing the use of property by using components and parts of items that are unserviceable, and extending the use of items that would otherwise be unserviceable. However, decisions to cannibalize Government personal property have an effect on the accuracy of property records, and inappropriate cannibalization can negatively affect the availability of excess property for reuse.

When can NIH property be cannibalized?
NIH property may be cannibalized when:
The property from which the components or parts are to be removed has been determined to be unserviceable.
The property from which the components or parts are to be removed has been determined to be obsolete and concurrence in that determination has been made by an IC Board of Survey.

Who is authorized to approve cannibalization requests?
NIH employees, contractors or other individuals may not cannibalize functioning property, even if obsolete or if a requirement exists for the item at NIH. The Chief, Property Management Branch or his designee must approve all cannibalization requests in writing before the cannibalization takes place.

Is removal of a hard drive considered cannibalization?
Removal of hard disks in support of the data and software sanitation policy is NOT considered cannibalization if the disk is reinstalled in the same computer or is affixed to the computer and reported for disposition with the computer.

What must I do if I want to initiate the removal of components from NIH property?
Individuals who wish to remove components from NIH property for use on other property must:
Initiate NIH Form 2741 Request to Cannibalize Personal Property. The justification must clearly prove that the cannibalization is in the best interest of the Government as a whole, not just the IC
Forward a copy of the form to their Property Custodial Officer for further action.
Individuals will not undertake a cannibalization until the transaction is approved by the Chief, Property Management Branch.
Any cannibalization preformed prior to approval from Chief, PMB will result in the initiation of HHS form 342 Report of Survey against the individual(s) responsible for the unauthorized cannibalization.

What are the responsibilities of the other parties that are involved in processing my request?

Property Custodial Officers (PCOs) will:

  • Add related data to the request from the official property record in the NBS.
  • Initiate changes to the property record as appropriate.
    1. Most often, changes will affect the value of the item being cannibalized. The PCO must record these value changes in the property system and the documentation must reflect the values recorded in the system.
    2. The official property record for property on a cannibalization request must reflect a condition code of 7 (Repairs required). If the system reflects a new or used condition code PMB and the IC Property Accountability Office (ICPAO) will reject the cannibalization request.
    3. When parts are removed from an item, the PCO must note the parts in the Comments field in the property system along with their values or estimated values.
    4. The PCO must report residual property to the Property Reutilization & Disposal Section as a disposal using normal disposal reporting procedure
  • Send the request to the ICPAO for concurrence.

ICPAOs will:

  1. Review documentation to assure it is complete and accurate.
  2. Assure that the automated property record is condition code 7.
  3. Approve requests for the cannibalization of non-capital, non-functional property when parts will be reported for disposition. Copies of approved requests must accompany remaining parts when that remaining property is disposed of.
  4. Forward requests for cannibalization of any capital property to the Chief, Property Management Branch For approval.
  5. Maintain a file of all approved cannibalization requests for later audit purposes.
  6. Advise the requestor of the approval.
  7. Review any request to cannibalize working property to determine if it is in the best interest of the Government to perform the cannibalization considering:
    1. The possibility of reuse of the property by another NIH or HHS entity.
    2. The possibility of donation of the property for research at a nonprofit research institute or institution of higher education.
    3. Any cost savings that may be achieved through the cannibalization.
    4. Other relevant IC considerations.
    5. Deny any request for cannibalization of working property.
    6. Notify the requestor of their approval of the request.
    7. Send the request to the PMB for approval.

Chief, Property Management Branch will:

  • Assure that the justification supports the cannibalization of any item of capital property.
  • Assure that the Property Account Manager and ICPAO appropriately updated the automated property record.
  • Approve or deny any request for the cannibalization of any item of capital or non-capital property.
  • Notify the Requestor of the approval or denial.
  • Notify Office of Financial Management of any transactions associated with the cannibalization of Capital property.
  1. Forward copies of approved cannibalization requests to the proper OFM authorities.
  2. Assure that the transactions properly reflect any change to property value.

The Supervisor, Reutilization and Disposal Section will approve any cannibalization of unrequired capital property.  The Supervisor, Reutilization and Disposal Section will retain full documentation of any approved cannibalization.
The Chief, Property Management Branch will approve or deny any cannibalization requests associated with the establishment of a parts supply inventory.

Moving Property from IC to IC

What should I know about moving property?
The last known user of personal property will be responsible for correcting any problems caused by improperly decontaminated property, even if custody has passed to another individual or organization. Users are responsible for the security of the items pending pickup. Users may be held financially responsible for loss, damage or destruction of the items.

How can I prepare my property for movement?
In order to prepare your property for movement, it is your responsibility to communicate with the Division of Safety (DS), Office of Research Services (ORS), to determine whether an item is hazardous or not. Section E prepares users to move property. Property users must contact the Occupational Safety and Health Branch (496-2346), DS, ORS for chemical and biological decontamination requirements or the Radiation Safety Branch (496-5774), DS, ORS, for radiological decontamination requirements before requesting movement of the items.

Once the property has been decontaminated, what do I do next?
You will be required to complete part two of NIH Form 2683 Certification that Property is Free from Hazards before reporting the property to PUB or requesting movement of the property. Any property requiring decontamination and all property leaving labs or clinical areas must display this hazardous tag. Transportation personnel will not remove property without this form.

How do I initiate the movement of property?
Users wishing to report property for movement or reutilization must notify their ICPCO. Contact your IC Administrative Officer (AO) for the name of your PCO. The PCO reports the transfer of Accountable property through the NBS (Sunflower) system.  Users and their PCOs may report non-accountable property for movement or reutilization purposes on the paper version of the NIH Form 649.

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Classifying and Recording Property - Managing Property

How do I classify my property?
When it comes to classifying an item, the class code is determined by what the item is and not by a manufacturer's description of an item. PCOs work from a standardized listing of items (i.e., computer monitor, computer personal, photocopier). All property classifications should be obtained from your PCO.

How do I record my property for accounting?
Recording property includes the recordation of property into the current automated property management system. Recordation responsibilities fall to the Purchasing Agent and also to the Property Custodial Officer (PCO). Proper property recordation includes knowing how the property should be classified according to the item's specific manufacturer, model and serial number. Recordation also includes the user, location and building associated with the item. The Purchasing Agent records the acquisition value and collects documents (required with credit card purchases also) associated with each piece of property. Other information including the acquisition date, receipt date and the date you plan to put the property in use is required and should also be put into the automated property system by the PCO.

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Identification of Property - Managing Property

How does NIH identify accountable property?
Accountable property is identified with an NIH decal that is a self-adhesive Mylar tag. The decal identifies the item as Property of NIH, Bethesda, MD and carries a unique bar code and identical legible property number. It serves as both a physical identification of Government property and as the unique control number to identify the item in the computerized property record.

Is leased property considered accountable property? How is its identification distinguished from other property?
No.  Each IC is tasked to identify and mark leased assets prior to annual inventory.

How should decals be handled and managed?
PCOs will affix decals to a clean, dry, smooth surface of the equipment. Care in handling is important. Personnel, including PCOs, may not move or remove the decal once in place. PMB will only approve the replacement of a decal once in place. PMB will only approve the replacement of a decal when full documentation proves that the item is exactly the same item as the item with the old decal. (Manufacturer and Serial Numbers must match).

Where should decals be placed and located on the property?
Location of the decal on the equipment is important. PCOs must place decals on the front of accountable items so that inventory personnel are easily able to scan the bar codes during an inventory. Often property cannot be moved because of its size or because it is being used so placement of decals on front of accountable items is essential.

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Internal use of Property - Managing Property

Receiving Property for Internal Use
With the exception of NIH offsite facilities, NIH disperses its receiving activities and duties throughout the agencies. Though a central receiving facility does not exist, the need for a standard receiving process does. Proper receiving practices involve more than simple confirmation of the receipt. Receiving also serves to close procurement actions, notify Accounts Payable of an action and begin the property management records cycle.

Various Property types and other definitions

What is the difference between real and personal property?
Real property includes land, buildings, improvements to land and buildings, utilities, and roads, while personal property is any property, except real property, of the Federal government that includes recorded (accountable) property, such as office and laboratory property, and other tangible assets such as books, expendable materials, and supplies.

What is accountability?
Accountability is an obligation imposed by law, administrative order, or regulation, upon officials of an agency to render an accounting to another official for funds or property entrusted to him/her, whether agency owned, leased or acquired by loan from any source through the maintenance of records and submission of prescribed reports.

What is recorded accountable property?
Recorded (accountable) property is personal property that requires management control and record keeping. Accountable or sensitive property is property which is subject to controls because of the property's high value, potential for misuse or theft, or risk to public and environmental health or safety. Accountable items normally include items valued at over $5,000 when new and items considered sensitive. Accountable items will display an NIH property decal with a bar code readable identification number. Some examples of accountable property include, but not limited to CPUs, monitors, printers, firearms, gamma counters, liquid scintillation counters, laptops, etc.

What is sensitive property?
Sensitive property is personal property that has a demonstrated susceptibility to loss, misuse or theft. Despite the lower value, these items must be controlled in the same manner as other accountable items, must be decaled, and must be carried on the accountable property records in NBS. Sensitive items include "nice to have" items which could easily be converted to private use. NIH has designated certain property, valued lower than the current accountability threshold, as sensitive when one or more of the following criteria apply.

  • There have been demonstrated and repeated instances of loss;
  • There is a possible threat to public health or safety;
  • The items have obvious personal appeal;
  • The items have a strong potential for improper use; and/or,
  • The items have a strong potential for improper resale.

Sensitive items also include property that could constitute a safety or health hazard if lost, misused or disposed of improperly and any clinical or research items that must be tracked for calibration and maintenance purposes in order to meet accreditation requirements.

What are some specific examples of sensitive items?
Specific examples of sensitive items include, but are not limited to-- any devices with radiological sources or components such as gamma counters, liquid scintillation counters, laboratory grade freezers (ultra low temperature and liquid gas), power tools (portable compressors, generators and table saws), personal computers and peripherals such as desktops, file servers, laptops (portable), smartphones, handhelds (including any items classified as "Personal Digital Assistants".), monitors, printers, digital cameras, audio/visual equipment, televisions, camcorders, DVD Players, Plasma and LCD Monitors, and weapons (including tranquilizer guns).

What is capital property versus non-capital property?
Capital property is a subset of recorded property that consists of personal property exceeding the capitalization threshold as set by DHHS. Non-Capital property is another subset of recorded property. Non-Capital property includes property recorded because it meets the accountability threshold and sensitive property, whether it meets the accountability threshold or not. Non-Capital property does not exceed capitalization thresholds.

What is unrecorded (non-accountable) property?
The formal property accounting system does not record most NIH property. Typically, unrecorded property is property that is not valuable enough and is not considered sensitive; it does not require record keeping in the automated system. However, all property requires some level of IC management control and attention.

What is personal custody property?
Personal custody property is property normally assigned to an individual for the life of the item; this property is normally portable and may be removed from and returned to NIH premises on a recurring basis. Personal custody property may or may not be recorded property. When supervisors assign property to an individual for their exclusive use (even for a temporary period), PCOs must issue, input responsible user in NBS (Sunflower) and supervisors must approve. Good examples of property controlled include laptop computers, cellular phones, palm top computers, and scientific calculators. Using the NBS (Sunflower) Property Pass allows individuals to remove and return property to and from NIH buildings, as many times as required to perform their official duties.

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Loans to Non-NIH Entities - Managing Property

There are two types of loans as described below.

  • Domestic Loans

What is a domestic loan and who must it benefit?
A domestic loan is a loan of personal property to an organization inside of or outside of the federal government. Domestic loans are only permitted when they will clearly benefit the United States Government. Domestic loans cannot be aid (i.e. a gift to help a lab/institution/hospital/humanitarian institution with limited funds) or the like. You cannot buy new property for a domestic loan. NIH does not have delegated authority from the U.S. Congress to provide any domestic aid. Providing aid is illegal.

How do I initiate a loan to an organization or an individual inside the federal government?
To begin the domestic loan process to an organization or individual inside the federal government, you must complete a NIH Form 2489-3 -Record of Personal Property Loan To Federal Organizations or individuals.

How do I initiate a loan to an organization or an individual outside of the federal government?
To begin the domestic loan process to an organization or individual outside the federal government, you must complete a NIH Form 2489-2 -Record of Personal Property Loan To Non-Federal Organizations.

How do I complete the Record of Personal Property Loan form?
IC personnel must complete blocks one through eleven of the form. The justification in block eight for the loan of federal property must specifically state the benefit to the Government.  A statement that the equipment will be used for NIH supported research at X university or similar general statements will not satisfy this requirement for a specific description. The justification must include the benefit to the government. If the justification is a collaborative study or cooperative agreement, reference the protocol number. The lender must provide the justification, not the borrower.

What do I do after I have completed blocks one through eleven?
After completing the blocks and obtaining all signatures as indicated, your next move depends on whether or not the property being loaned is accountable. If the property is accountable, then take your request to your PCO or PAO and have him/her print a screen shot of the decal number of the equipment that is being loaned out. Attach the screenshot to the original documentation and forward to the address below. If the property is NOT Accountable, No additional documentation is needed, If your property is accountable or non-accountable, then you can forward your request to the address below.
Property Management Branch (PMB)
6011 Executive Boulevard
Suite 645B3
Rockville, Maryland 20892
You can also fax your request to 301-496-8428 for processing.

How long will processing take after I send the form to PMB?
Once received by PMB, processing normally takes up to five business days, If your request takes longer than five business days then call 301-594-2078 to check on the status of your request.

What should I know about the domestic loan process?

  • Approvals and Denials:
    Domestic donations can and have been denied. Do not ship any federal property prior to receiving loan approval from the PMB. The PMB will not process domestic loan documentation if the property has already been shipped and is no longer at the NIH. Processing domestic loan documentation after the fact is illegal.
  • Loans are only valid for a one year period.  The loan may be loaned for longer, but the process needs to be resubmitted for the following year prior to the loan expiring.
  • Domestic Loan Shipping Costs: 
    In general, the shipping costs for a loan should be borne by the recipient of the loan and not the NIH IC. Shipping cost responsibility will be evaluated for each donation on a case-by-case basis.

What happens after the form receives NIH approvals?
Once all approvals have been received, the appropriate NIH offices will be notified and the signed documentation will be sent back. Property to be loaned can then be shipped.

How should the approving paperwork be managed?
If the domestic loan is approved, the IC property or donating lab personnel should keep all approval documentation for reconciling future inventories (and as proof that the property is not lost or stolen). If the approval is for a domestic loan and the property is accountable, then decaled property is involved and you must contact your IC Property Custodial Officer. The IC PCO must put the appropriate loan information into the NBS database.   This will help you and the IC to avoid accountability problems in future inventory inspections. Contact PMB at 301-496-5712 for additional information about this process.

Who should I contact if I have other questions on the domestic loan process?
Any PMB staff person can address any additional questions that you may have in this area. PMB staff can be reached at 301-496-5712.

  • Foreign Donations or Loans

What is a foreign donation or loan and who must it benefit?
The National Institutes of Health allows for the limited donation or loan of excess (unneeded) property to foreign entities (individuals and organizations) as permitted by federal regulations and Public Law 93-353. Donations or loans are only permitted when they will clearly benefit the health of the United States public. Foreign loans/donations cannot be foreign aid (i.e. a gift to help a lab/institution/hospital/humanitarian institution with limited funds) or the like. You cannot buy new property for foreign loan or donation purposes. NIH does not have delegated authority from the U.S. Congress to provide any foreign aid to other countries. Providing foreign aid is illegal.

What is excess (unneeded) property?
Excess (unneeded) property is property that DHHS no longer requires for performance of any of its activities by any of DHHS' agencies. ICs should note that, any internal DHHS requirement legally overrides any foreign or domestic loan or donation request. PMB may screen these donations with NIH and other DHHS components to ensure that no internal requirement exists.

How do I know if my property qualifies as excess property? How can I start the foreign donation/loan process?
When PMB receives your written donation or loan request, the property will be screened throughout NIH for the appropriate time as required by the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). If the property is not required during the screening process, then the written request will continue through the foreign donation/loan process until it is ultimately approved or denied. To begin the foreign donation/loan process, the initiating NIH activity must complete NIH Form 2489_1 Record of Loan/Donation of Personal Property to Foreign Countries.

How do I complete NIH Form 2489_1 Record of Loan/Donation of Personal Property to Foreign Countries?
IC personnel must complete blocks one through eleven of the form. Block five must specify the name of the receiving individual (and not an institution) in order to be processed. The justification for foreign donation or loan (block seven) of federal property must specifically state the benefit to the U.S. Public Health. Block seven must include and finish the following statement:
"This loan/donation will benefit the U.S. Public Health by......."
This completed statement must be included in order for the form to be processed. [NOTE: Please remember that foreign loans/donations cannot be foreign aid (i.e. a gift to help a lab, institution, hospital, humanitarian institution or the like) which is illegal. NIH does not have delegated authority from the U.S. Congress to provide any foreign aid to other countries. PPB must return requests without justification or requests that do not clearly explain the benefit to the health of the US public.]

What do I do after I have completed blocks one through eleven?
After completing the blocks and obtaining all signatures as indicated, forward the original documentation to:

Mr. Michael Kessler, Supervisor
Reutilization and Disposal Section
Personal Property Section, Dock 12
National Institutes of Health, MSC 9674
16050 Industrial Drive
Gaithersburg, MD 20877

How long will processing take after I send the form to PMB?
Once received by PMB, processing through NIH upper management normally takes about three weeks.

What should I know about the foreign donations/loans process?

  • Approvals and Denials:
    Foreign donations can and have been denied. Do not ship any federal property prior to receiving donation/loan approval from the PMB. The PMB will not process foreign donation/loan documentation if the property has already been shipped and is no longer at the NIH. Processing foreign donation/loan documentation after the fact is illegal.
  • Foreign Donation/Loan Shipping Costs:
    In general, the shipping cost for a foreign loan or donation should be borne by the recipient of the loan or donation and not the NIH IC. Shipping cost responsibility will be evaluated for each donation on a case-by-case basis.

What happens after the form receives NIH approvals?
Once all approvals have been received, the appropriate NIH offices will be notified and documentation provided. If accountable property is being donated (i.e. property that has NIH barcoded decals on it and is in the NBS (Sunflower) database, then the IC Property Custodial Officer responsible for the decal numbers must transfer them to custodial code PPB09 to clear them from the IC's property listing. In the remarks section of the electronic transfer, please provide the approval number written on the NIH 2489-1 form at the top of the form. (This number starts with A13-XXX-XX).
The property can then be shipped to a foreign destination.
IMPORTANT: If NIH shipping (located in building 13 of NIH) is being used, please complete the NIH Form 1884 Request for Shipment as follows to expedite shipment:

What should I do to expedite shipment using NIH Form 1884 Request for Shipment?
In box 16, write the approval number on the NIH 2489-1 form (i.e. the A13-XXX-XX number). If possible, provide a copy of the signed NIH 2489-1 form with the Request for Shipment.
In box, please have the IC Property Accountable Officer (PAO) sign and date this box as indicated. This signature must be on the NIH 1884 form in order for the shipment to be released.
** NOTE: FAILURE TO PROVIDE THE ABOVE INFORMATION AND SIGNATURES WILL DELAY SHIPMENT UNTIL THIS INFORMATION HAS BEEN RECEIVED BY THE NIH SHIPPING OFFICE AND THE PERSONAL PROPERTY BRANCH.

How should the approving paperwork be managed?
If the approval is for a foreign loan, the IC property or donating lab personnel should keep all approval documentation for reconciling future inventories (and as proof that the property is not lost or stolen). If the approval is for a foreign donation and accountable, decaled property is involved, you must contact your IC Property Custodial Officer. The IC Property Custodial Officer must transfer the decal number to a designated PMB code to remove the item from your responsibility and from the IC's inventory listing. This will help you and the IC avoid accountability problems in future inventory inspections. Contact PMB at 301 496-5712 for additional information about this process.

Who should I contact if I have other questions on the foreign donations/loans process?
Any additional questions that you may have in this area can be addressed by Mr. Michael Kessler, Reutilization and Disposal Section Supervisor who can be reached at kesslerm@mail.nih.gov or (301) 594-9915.

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Loss, Damage or Destruction of Property and Boards of Survey - Managing Property

Loss, Damage or Destruction of Property:

The following is a summary of processes used to report the Loss, Damage and/or Destruction (LDD) of Government Property.
Responsible Users are NIH personnel assigned exclusive use of Government property made available for the performance of their official duties, who are responsible for the care and protection of Government property as an obligation inherent to all employed personnel at NIH.  The Responsible User has the responsibility to maintain and manage Government property in their care, and must report the LDD of Government property within five business days of occurrence or discovery to their PCO, PAO, Supervisor or local authority to initiate a Report of Survey (ROS).  If for any reason there is a delay of the reporting timeline for a LDD incident, a letter of lateness must be submitted with the ROS to explain the reason for the delay.

Please reference this training video for an overview of the NIH Report of Survey Process.

Property Custodial Officer

Property Custodial Officers (PCO) must promptly initiate a ROS upon notification by the responsible user of any LDD of Government property, and submit the ROS to the Property Accountability Officer.

Property Accountability Officer

A Property Accountability Officer (PAO) is appointed by an IC Executive Officer (EO); is responsible for the management, recording, accounting and reporting of property within the IC.  The PAO’s responsibilities cannot be delegated.  Each IC PAO retains documents on all capital and non-capital property ROS actions for the period required by applicable record retention policies.

  • Provides any information that may have a bearing on the Board Of Survery (BOS) hearing in block 5 of the ROS, HHS Form 342, signs and dates the form.  The PAO must forward the ROS with supporting documentation to the Appointing Authority.
  • Log and track all ROS and ensure the process is completed within 90 calendar days.
  • Provides a copy of the ROS Log  (sample copy in Appendix B) to PMB on a monthly basis to validate ROS assets.

Report of Survey Officer (Survey Officer)

A Report of Survey Officer (Survey Officer) is appointed by the Appointing Authority to investigate the loss, damage, or destruction of Government property and the circumstances involved.  The Survey Officer serves as the Chair of the BOS.

  • Appointed Survey Officers must meet the following criteria:
    • GS-13 and above
    • Commission Corp Officers (any grade level)
    • Disinterested Person
    • Property personnel are exempt from this appointment (e.g. PAO, PCO, PMB staff)
  • The Survey Officer’s responsibilities include:
    • Conducts an immediate investigation after appointment received in writing, and consults with Appointing Authority and/or PMB for guidance.
    • Completes a thorough investigation within 30 days; conducts interviews, obtains signed statements, compiles and reviews all evidence/exhibits, and scrutinizes all available information to develop findings and recommendations.
    • Attaches additional exhibits as necessary.  Uses own words how losses occurred, referring to statements and evidence to support findings.
    • For an asset(s) with an acquisition cost less than $1,000, the Survey Officer can make the recommendation to assess financial liability or relieve person(s) of responsibility without convening a BOS.
    • Notifies the Appointing Authority and PAO immediately if the property is discovered during ROS period.

Board of Survey

A Board of Survey (BOS) is a panel of three to five members appointed by the Appointing Authority to serve as a fact finding body to determine the circumstances and conditions surrounding the LDD of NIH accountable property, and recommend disposition decisions of Government property.
The appointment of employees to serve on a BOS is based on recommendations of the PAO.  The BOS is convened to ensure a complete and thorough hearing is conducted that examines and verifies all evidence presented, documents findings and makes determinations as to whether individual(s) involved are assessed financial liability or is relieved of LDD responsibility.

  • A BOS shall consist of three to five members (the Recorder is not a member of the BOS).
  • Based on review of the completed survey, determines if the reported LDD of Government property was the result of negligence, misconduct or reckless disregard for the property.
  • Makes determination to assess or relief financial liability and/or disciplinary action of individual(s) involved.
  • Provides final BOS recommendations to the Appointing Authority for appropriate review and disposition.

Appointing Authority

The Appointing Authority is delegated OK the IC EO, who appoints the Report of Survey Officer and selects Board of Survey members.  The Appointing Authority reviews findings and manage the survey process for the IC. 

  • The Appointing Authority may also serve as the Determining Authority for non-capital property with an aggregate value less than $500K.
  • Appoints a Survey Officer and Board of Survey members within 5 days of receiving an initiated HHS Form 342, Report of Survey.
  • Reviews and accepts the BOS recommendations or returns the ROS to the BOS for further review and reconsideration.
  • Forwards the BOS findings/recommendations to the Determining Authority or to Office of General Counsel (OGC) for legal review if financial liability is assessed.
  • Forwards BOS findings/recommendations for all capital assets and non-capital assets with an aggregate value over $500K to PMB for administrative review prior to Determining Authority approving the accepted BOS recommendations.
  • If financial liability is assessed, the Appointing Authority informs the individual of pecuniary liability in writing, explains the findings and rights to appeal, explains the appeal process to request for reconsideration, submission of additional statements and/or new evidence.
  • Notifies supervisory and human resources authorities, financial management and property management personnel of any necessary actions.

Determining Authority

  • The Determining Authority is the Chief Management Official of each IC responsible for making a final determination on BOS recommendations for all capital assets and non-capital assets with an aggregate value over $500K.  This authority may not be delegated.
    • Reviews the BOS recommendations to concur and accept, or non-concur and return the ROS to the BOS for further review.
    • Coordinates with personnel, property and supervisory authorities to assure that accepted recommendations are executed.
    • Ensures the copies of all completed and signed ROS with accepted recommended actions for capital assets and non-capital assets with an aggregate value over $500K is provided to the PMB for appropriate property record adjustments.
  • For non-capital assets with an aggregate value less than $500K, the Determining Authority may be delegated the EO to serve as the Determining Authority.  An EO serving as a PAO cannot serve as the Determining Authority or Appointing Authority.  The EO serving as the Determining Authority shall:
    • Review the BOS recommendations to concur/non-concur.
    • Forward the ROS packet to the OGC for legal review.
    • Ensure the copies of all completed and signed ROS with accepted recommended actions for non-capital assets with an aggregated value less than $500k is provided to the PMB for appropriate property record adjustments.

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Management Control and Inventories - Managing Property

Why do we do inventories? And why this way?
A physical inventory is necessary to

  1. Verify the accuracy of records which reflect the status of personal property,
  2. Reconcile with the property records with the fiscal records,
  3. Discover the need for additional safeguards to prevent misuse, theft, and other losses, and
  4. Disclose procedural weakness in routing vouchers and posting inventory records.

When and how does inventorying occur?
Inventorying occurs cyclically throughout the fiscal year.

What is inventoried and how often does this occur?
In accordance with the General Services Administration (GSA), NIH is required by law to inventory all accountable, personal property annually. A complete, physical inventory shall be conducted on all sensitive items annually. When an employee is authorized to remove personal custody items from HHS facilities, a physical inventory is not required. However the employee shall be required to have a valid property Pass for assets still in his or her possession.

Inventorying can sometimes take a while. How can I help expedite the inventorying process?
To help expedite the process, all personal accountable and sensitive property items should be taken out of drawers and off shelves so they can be readily seen and inventoried.

How can I learn more about inventories and the inventorying process?
Any PMB staff person can address any additional questions that you may have in this area. PMB staff can be reached at (301) 496-5712.

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Property Pass & Personal Custody Receipt - Managing Property

Property Pass:
What is a property pass and why do I need one?
A property pass is a permission slip that allows NIH employees to remove NIH property from NIH buildings and satellite offices with authority from authorized officials. All NIH Police Officers are required to ask for a property pass whenever they observe anyone removing any property item from NIH buildings or satellite facilities.

How many different types of passes are there? Which pass is right for me? How long is it good for?
There are two different types of property passes. One is for accountable property and the other is for non-accountable property. Property passes are only good for up to one year.

How can I get a property pass for accountable property?
The property pass for accountable property can only be generated through your Property Custodial Officer (PCO) using the current automated property system. When you go to your PCO, you should have the following information with you to initiate the process for obtaining a property pass. This information includes

  1. Your name and location,
  2. The decal number of the accountable item,
  3. Your justification for removing property,
  4. The name of the person authorizing your removal of property,
  5. Your date of need for beginning use of the property, and
  6. Your anticipated return date of the accountable property.

How can I get a property pass for non-accountable property?
The property pass for non-accountable property is a HHS Form 439 that replaces HHS Form 368 Property Pass. Download and print this form. Complete the form and submit to your PCO.

How are property passes processed? How long does it take? What makes my property pass valid?
Once you submit the necessary information for your pass to your PCO, it will be processed and signed by the necessary officials (these vary by IC). The process of obtaining a property pass usually takes up to three business days. Once your pass has been processed, it is not valid until it receives an official signature by your IC. Two copies of your pass will be processed. You must keep one copy with the property at all times, and one copy for the PCO's records. Once issued, passes are only valid for one year. Property passes must be updated annually.

Personal Custody Receipt:
What is a personal custody receipt and why do I need one?
A personal custody receipt is authorization that allows you to remove and transport individually assigned non-accountable, sensitive NIH property from NIH buildings and satellite offices without a property pass. Some examples of sensitive items where personal custody receipts are given include laptops, cameras and personal digital assistants.

How do I get a personal custody receipt and how long is it good for?
The personal custody receipt for non-accountable, Property can only be generated through your Property Custodial Officer (PCO). Your personal custody receipt will be issued when your property is issued to you. You should have the following information with you to initiate the process including

  1. Your name and location,
  2. Non-accountable asset description, and
  3. The name of the person authorizing your removal of property.

How can I find out more about property passes and personal custody receipts?
Any PMB staff person can address any additional questions that you may have in this area. PMB staff can be reached at (301) 496-5712.

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Exchanges and Trade Ins - Acquiring Property

Exchanges and Trade Ins have been grouped as follows.  

Exchanges

What is an exchange?
An exchange occurs when you substitute one thing for another at no additional cost to you or the vendor. Exchanges usually occur to replace malfunctioning property that is under warranty or to replace property which does not meet requirements with a more appropriate item.

How can I initiate an exchange?
Go to your Property Custodial Officer and have him/her complete Parts 1-5 of NIH Form 1872 Request for Trade-in or Exchange of Government-owned Property. Select "exchange" in the Type of Action section. Forward this form to the Property Management Branch (PMB).

What must I know when making an exchange?
You must know that it is very important that NIH Form 1872 be completed since you are responsible for the exchanged property until the PMB approves the transaction. For more information contact PMB.

Property Custodial Officer Exchange Procedures

Complete Parts 1-5 of NIH Form 1872  when property under warranty is exchanged or replaced. The following documentation is required: A copy of the NBS record of the exchanged and new asset. A receipt (Federal Express receipt, copy of the vendor's work order or a return authorization number) showing the item was sent to or taken by the vendor. 

Trade- In

What is a Trade-In? Why perform a trade-in?
A trade-in occurs when you turn in as payment or partial payment an item for a purchase or for a bill. Trading in property can help you reduce the costs of new equipment and dispose of old equipment. Many vendors (including some on GSA contracts) accept used office and lab equipment, despite the condition, for trade-in against the purchase of new equipment.

What factors affect the trade in decision?
Factors affecting the trade-in decision include the item's age, expected obsolescence of the item, the repair history of the item and the difficulty in obtaining parts for the item.

When can I consider a trade in and does it have to be for similar equipment?
Trade-ins can only be made to reduce the purchase price of new, similar items. For example, you can trade in lab equipment for lab equipment but not a copier for a centrifuge. The equipment being traded does not necessarily have to be from the same manufacturer.

What if I don't have similar equipment available for trade-in?
Labs and offices that do not have similar equipment items available for trade-in, should contact the NIH Division of Logistics, Property Management Branch, Property Reutilization and Disposal Section at 301-594-9915. An equipment specialist will search the NIH excess property inventory to determine if an acceptable piece of equipment is available there for trade in. This process saves you acquisition costs and helps reduce NIH's handling costs for surplus property.

What must I know about the trade-in amount of my item?
The trade-in amount must exceed $100 plus the administrative costs to perform the transaction. For example, if you have a $200 trade-in offer that requires the IC to spend $300 to deliver the item to the vendor, then this is not cost-effective and your trade in request cannot be approved.

Can NIH owned equipment be traded to reduce the cost of a leasing agreement?
No. NIH-owned equipment cannot be traded to reduce the cost of a leasing agreement.

Are special certifications required when trading in an item?
All scientific and clinical equipment to be traded in must be certified as clean of all possible hazardous substances, e.g., radiological, chemical or biohazards. For instruments containing radiation sources, contact the Radiation Safety Branch at 301-496-5774 for guidance and assistance. Clearance tags NIH Form 2683 * Certification that Equipment is Free from Hazards) are available in the NIH Self-Service Stores.

What if I have equipment that I don't need that does not qualify for trade in?
Equipment which is excess to your needs and not meeting the trade-in requirements should be transferred to the Personal Property Branch.

What happens if the vendor does not want to remove the item being traded in?
Vendors must remove old items. We recommend writing the following clause into the Purchase Order: "Payment will be withheld from the vendor until pickup of trade-in item is complete." If vendors do not pick up traded items, ICDs may experience significant problems, including property inventory confusion, decontamination expenses, etc. ICDs may also be required to set aside funds equal to the value of the item to comply with Federal Management Regulations (citation) regarding abandoned property.

How do I initiate a trade in?
If your item has met all the conditions for trade-in, you should contact your PCO to help you initiate the paperwork for the trade in.

Property Custodial Officer Trade-in Procedures

Completely fill in Parts 1-5 of NIH Form 1872 * Request for Trade-in or Exchange of Government-owned Property. Forward the form to the Property Management Branch, 6011 Executive Boulevard, Suite 645B3, with the following documentation: Copies of an official price quote from the vendor showing the trade-in dollar amount being offered. A copy of the requisition being submitted to procurement (it should also show the trade-in dollar amount in the appropriate space). A copy of the NBS(Sunflower) record for each item being traded.

 

Receiving Property - Acquiring Property

Receiving Property has the following types.

Receipt from Acquisition

 What do I need to know when receiving property from acquisition?

If the procurement official fails to designate a Receiving Official, the individual who is designated as the one the property is to be "Shipped To" is the default Receiving Official. As the designated Receiving Official, you are accountable for all received property until relieved of that responsibility through a documented transfer of the property to another accountable user. In a purchase card transaction, the Ordering Official and the Receiving Official may be the same person. Department Manuals require receiving offices to prepare receiving documentation and notify appropriate financial, property and procurement officials of the receipt in a timely manner.

What are the procedures if I am the Receiving Official? What should the receiving documents contain?
The procedures for the Receiving Official are outlined in Section Order  of manual of the Personal Property Management Guide (PPMG) . This section also includes information on the required property elements needed for receiving. Appendix B of the manual chapter includes a sample NIH Form 2818 Notification of Receipt of Personal Property. It provides an example of a document that the receiving official could use to assure that he/she obtains necessary data elements.

Property Custodial Officer (PCO)

A PCO is responsible for maintenance of personal property records. PCOs must remain aware of all changes to personal property occurring in their Custodial Accounts. They are also the property users initial point of contact for policy, procedure, and information pertaining to a specific property item. They maintain a working knowledge of property management policies and regulations and are able to assist property users, supervisors, and managers in the management of NIH property. They must be recommended by their supervisor, nominated by the Property Accountability Officer (PAO), and appointed by an IC Executive Officer.

Property Accountability Officer (PAO)

The PAO is responsible for the management, recording, accounting, and reporting of property within an IC.  PAOs work closely with the PCOs within their organizations to ensure the purchase of new property that meet the criteria for management and control are properly processed, a correct property record is established, and the property is appropriately decaled.

Procedures

Checking Mandatory Sources for Excess Property

  • Each IC is required to establish a process for checking mandatory sources prior to procuring new assets. ICs must satisfy the FAR Part 8 - Required Sources of Supplies and Services requirements from the sources and publications listed below:
  • IC Inventories – This is property that is under the control of the individual ICs.  When practicable, ICs must use excess personal property as the first source of supply.  NIH personnel must make positive efforts to satisfy the requirements by obtaining and using excess personal property (including that suitable for adaptation or substitution) before initiating a new purchase.  ICs are required to establish a mechanism to identify excess property within its control available for reutilization.  The mechanism will be made available to the Acquisition staff, and if practicable, to all users within the IC.
  • GDC Excess Inventories – Property turned-in by ICs to the PRDS as excess property, stored at the Gaithersburg Distribution Center (GDC) and is available for reutilization.  A nVision query for custodial code “GDC” can be run to view the current inventory of excess property at GDC, or contact PRDS at 301-594-9915 for more information.
  • GSA Surplus – This is excess property transferred from NIH or other federal agencies to General Services Administration (GSA) as surplus.  For more information on GSA http://gsaxcess.gov/ or contact PRDS at the GDC, 301-594-9915.
  • Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (FPI) (also known as UNICOR) – ICs are encouraged to purchase Federal Prison Industries, Inc. supplies and services to the maximum extent practicable.  http://www.unicor.gov/.
  • Supplies on the Procurement List – The Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled maintains a Procurement List of all supplies and services required to be purchased from AbilityOne participating nonprofit agencies.  The Procurement List may be accessed at: http://www.abilityone.gov/index.html.
  • Wholesale Supply Sources – This includes stock programs of the GSA (41 CFR 101-26.3), the Defense Logistics Agency (41 CFR 101-26.6), the Department of Veterans Affairs (41 CFR 101-26.704), and military inventory control points.
  • Mandatory and Optional Federal Supply Schedules (also referred to as the GSA Schedules Program or the Multiple Award Schedule Program) – The Federal Supply Schedule program is directed and managed by GSA and provides Federal agencies with a simplified process for obtaining commercial supplies and services at prices associated with volume buying.
  • Commercial Sources (including educational and nonprofit institutions) – This is the last source for supplies that cannot be obtained through the mandatory sources listed.
  • The property user/requestor and purchase agent must jointly certify that available excess inventories were checked prior to ordering property for purchase.  The purchase agent must comply with use of mandatory sources for the purchase of property items.
  • The procedures for requesting excess property from the Property Reutilization and Disposal Section at GDC or the Surplus Yard on the NIH campus are different depending on whether the property is accountable or non-accountable.
  • To screen accountable excess property for redeployment from the GDC, NIH employees must bring the following:
  • NIH Employee ID – only NIH Government employees are authorized to screen and request excess property for reutilization.  Contract personnel are not eligible to screen or remove Government property from the GDC.
  • IC Property Custodial Code (CC) - This is a five-digit account number obtained from the PCO for the organization location for the property.
  • Common Account Number (CAN) - for the cost of transporting redeployed property if the user is not able to transport the property.
  • PCO Name and Phone Number - provide the PCO name and phone number who manages the IC Property CC.  It is imperative that users pre-arrange excess property screening with their PCO before going to the GDC.  If the employee fails to contact the PCO at the time of pick up, then the property will be held for one business day before it is put back into excess inventory for screening.  The PCO must accept the transfer of property selected for redeployment from the GDC.
  • The Reutilization and Surplus Yard on the main NIH campus has used furniture (e.g., chairs, file cabinets, credenzas, etc.) and used large lab equipment (e.g., refrigerators, hoods).  This property is available for reutilization by NIH ICs on a first come, first serve basis.  To screen excess non-accountable property for redeployment from the Reutilization and Surplus Yard:

Property is available for screening Monday through Friday at the Surplus Yard.  All screening must be done in person.  The Surplus Yard does not take phone orders.

Property removed from the Surplus Yard must be for official use only.  Only NIH Government employees can screen property at the Surplus Yard.  NIH employees should pre-arrange screening for non-accountable property with their respective PCO to coordinate the removal and transfer of property from the Surplus Yard.

NIH employees must bring an NIH Employee ID, PCO name and phone number, and custodial code.  The screener should tag selected property items and complete NIH Form 1514, Property Utilization Record of Non-Accountable Property Issued for furniture or Standard Form (SF) 122, Transfer Order Excess Property for all other non-accountable property.

The screener/user must arrange for transportation to remove the property from the Surplus Yard.  Transportation for moving the property is at the IC’s expense.

Purchasing Controls for Property Assets

  • ICs are responsible for establishing adequate internal controls to ensure property accountability. It is recommended that ICs assign property specific Purchasing Agents or designated approvers for IT property purchases to centralize control and accountability of sensitive IT equipment (e.g., smart phones and laptops).  IT equipment must be decaled immediately upon receipt to ensure proper tracking in NBS, and be processed through CIT prior to issue to the user.  To avoid discrepancies in property tracking, users should not receive IT equipment directly.
  • IC Acquisition and Property personnel should carefully review requests for new phones or other IT equipment that may be subject to service plan renewal discounts that may be misinterpreted as a zero or near zero cost.  The retail value of the device must be listed for property tracking purposes.
  • The Purchasing Agent must select the appropriate Object Class Code (OCC) to ensure that property is recorded and tracked correctly in NBS.  The most common OCC for property is OCC 31. A complete list of property OCC is available.
  • In the case of a cooperative, joint purchase of property or a capital asset (e.g., an MRI) by multiple ICs, the ICs must determine the appropriate requisitioner and responsible custodian for the property.  The custodian IC is responsible for maintenance and inventory of the capital asset.  More information on joint purchases is available at https://nbrssprod.cit.nih.gov:8050/NBSJobAids/Acquisition.aspx or contact your servicing Acquisition Office.

Receipt from Fabrication

What is fabricated property?
Fabricated property is property that is built, manufactured, finally assembled or fabricated by NIH activities.

What are my responsibilities when it comes to fabricated property?
As a NIH employee, you must notify your Property Accountability Officer (PAO) upon completion of any fabricated item and provide

  • A full description of the item, including component parts, and its function, and
  • The full cost of the item, including any supporting documentation that is available.

As a PAO you will

  1. Use the information supplied by the NIH employees to obtain an appropriate property classification for the item from the Property Management Branch (PMB),
  2. Create a record in the automated property management system using the information from the NIH employee and the cataloging office in PMB, and
  3. Manually add that record to the property system.

Found on Station
What do I need to know when receiving property that I have found on station?
It is assumed that all property found within NIH facilities is NIH Government owned property unless that property is clearly identified as belonging to another individual or entity. Property management personnel, including Institute or Center Property Accountability Officers (ICPAO), inventory technicians and personnel from the PMB, may require holders of non-NIH property to document their ownership when they identify it as their own. In the event that property is found on station, Property Accountability Officers will take immediate action to establish control and to record all found property, which appears to meet the criteria for property recording and control

Receipt from Lease/Rental

What should I know about receiving leased or rented property?
When receiving leased or rented property, there are vital records that must be obtained and maintained for the leased/rented item. This information includes:

  • The property's condition when received, whether used or new,
  • Reference to the lease, contract or agreement including lease rates,
  • The length of the lease agreement,
  • Whether the item is leased under conditions that will lead to ownership, and
  • The date when the ownership option should be decided.

What should I do with the leased/rental property information that I obtain?
You should pass this information onto your Property Accountability Officers. The Property Accountability Officers shall maintain a property record, similar to the accountable property record, for each item or group of identical items leased by the organization for which he/she is the accountable official. Property The leased assets will not be added to the NBS (Sunflower) system.  Assets having a value of $5,000 or more that is being leased to ownership shall be reported to Finance.

Receipt from Other Federal Agency

How do I receive property from another federal agency?
Property that is received from another federal agency is generally obtained via word of mouth. As soon as you find government property that you need from another federal agency, contact the party responsible for that property so that you can begin the process of obtaining it. Once you know that you are going to be able to successfully obtain the property, contact Michael Kessler at kesslerm@mail.nih.gov or at (301) 594-9915 so that you can complete the necessary paperwork required to receive the accountable item. All items that are received by other government agencies are considered accountable property for inventorying.

Receipt from Reutilization

What do I need to know about receiving reutilized property?
The procedures used for receiving reutilized property are different depending upon whether the property is accountable or non-accountable. The procedure for receiving reutilized accountable property and non-accountable property is explained in the link: Procedure for receiving reutilized accountable and non-accountable property

Procedure for receiving reutilized accountable and non-accountable property

What do I need to select and remove from the GDC as a NIH employee?
As a NIH employee, in order to select and remove property for official use after screening at the GDC, you need to bring the following with you:

  • Your NIH Photo ID. You must be a NIH government employee. This property is available to NIH government employees only . Government contractors are not eligible to remove and/or reutilize government property from the GDC.
  • Your NIH Property Custodial Code for your work area. This is a five-digit account number that you can get from your Property Custodial Officer (PCO).
  • Your Common Account Number (CAN) to pay for transporting property back to your business area for official use if you are not able to transport the property yourself.
  • The Name and phone number of the Property Custodial Officer (PCO) who controls your NIH Property Custodial Code. It is imperative that you pre-arrange acceptance of all desired property with your PCO. Call and let your PCO know that you would like for him/her to accept property that you want transferred from the GDC. You should try your very best to coordinate the time of your screening at the GDC with your PCO because your PCO must verify acceptance by phone before items can be released from the GDC. You cannot remove accountable property from the GDC until your Property Custodial Officer electronically accepts it. If you fail to contact your PCO at the time of pick up, then your property will be held for one business day before it is put back into circulation for screening by other government employees.

How can I find out more information about getting property from the GDC as a NIH employee?
For more information, contact Michael Kessler at kesslerm@mail.nih.gov or 301-594-9915.

What do I need to select and remove property from the GDC as a non-NIH government employee?
As a non-NIH government employee, in order to select and remove property back to your business area for official use after screening at the GDC, you need to contact Michael Kessler at kesslerm@mail.nih.gov or (301) 594-9915 to schedule a screening time. After scheduling a time for screening, you will be asked to bring the following with you:

  • A signed memo from your supervisor that grants you permission to screen property at the GDC.
  • Property Transfer Form with appropriate property personnel signatures.
    HHS personnel need to use a HHS-22 Request for Property Action. Army personnel are required to complete a Form 1361, 1348, or 1149. All other government employees need to complete a SF 122 Transfer Order Excess Property.
  • Your government Photo ID.

How can I find out more information about getting property from the GDC as a Non-NIH employee?
For more information, contact Michael Kessler at kesslerm@mail.nih.gov or (301)594-9915.

Receipt of Gift - Conditional versus Unconditional

What is a gift?
A gift is a gratuitous conveyance or transfer of ownership in property without any consideration. For purposes of the Department of Health and Human Services statutes authorizing acceptance of gifts, a grant to NIH may qualify as a conditional gift. In ordinary usage, "grant" means "gift", usually for a particular purpose.

What is a conditional gift?
A conditional gift is a gift in which the donor imposes some condition or restriction on the use of the gift or as a condition to be met in order to obtain the gift. NIH is not authorized to expend conditional gift funds to support functions not encompassed within the terms of the conditions. IC Directors/Deputy Directors are responsible for accepting gifts within their statutory or delegated authority.

What is an unconditional gift?
An unconditional gift is one in which the donor does not impose some condition or restriction on the use of the gift or as a condition to be met in order to obtain the gift. NIH is authorized to expend unconditional gift funds to support any of its authorized functions, within the scope of the intended use designated by the donor, including research on a specific disease. When a donor limits a gift to a particular IC or other NIH component or to support research on a specific disease or activity without further specification as to its purpose or manner of use, the gift is considered unconditional and may be used to carry out the mission of the recipient IC or relating to research into that specific disease or activity. IC Directors/Deputy Directors are responsible for accepting unconditional gifts within their statutory or delegated authority.

What should I know about receiving and accepting gifts?
Under federal law, funds received by or for the United States or its agencies, including gifts, must be deposited in and administered through government accounts and may not be deposited with or otherwise administered by other persons or organizations. An outside organization, such as a foundation whose mission is solely or in part to support NIH activities, may not serve as a financial intermediary for a third party in the donation of funds, equipment, supplies, or other resources to be used in support of NIH activities or employees in the performance of their official duties, such as intramural research, unless authorized by law. Currently, the only acceptable financial intermediary for third party donation of funds is the Foundation for the NIH which operates under explicit statutory authority to solicit, accept, invest, and manage third party donations to support the NIH in its mission. Other than for NIH Foundation-administered gifts, NIH policy is that the statutory gift acceptance authorities provide an adequate basis for accepting all donations, if otherwise proper, directly from the donors, while allowing NIH managers to control the administration of these gift resources. In the use of gift acceptance authority, employees and managers must determine whether acceptance of the gift would compromise or appear to compromise the integrity of the NIH or any of its employees. Authority to accept gifts is set forth in NIH Manual Chapter 1130, , Finance #5, "Accept Gifts Under Section 231 of the PHS Act", unless exceptions or waivers have been otherwise granted under a specific separate statutory authority.

How can I learn more about gifts?
More about receiving gifts and gifts in general can be found in manual chapter 1135 Gifts Administration.

Receiving Borrowed Property

What should I know about receiving borrowed property?
Property loaned to NIH from outside activities can result in:

  • Real or perceived conflicts of interest,
  • Unauthorized procurements,
  • Improper budget augmentation,
  • Liability for loss and damage, and
  • Confusion over ownership during physical inventories. DHHS regulations strongly discourage the practice of "borrowing" property.

How do I receive borrowed property?
Activities contemplating borrowing property must

  • Clearly justify how the transaction is in the best interest of the Government,
  • Complete NIH Form 2179 Agreement for Loan, and
  • Forward this form and justification through your Property Custodial Officer and IC Property Accountability Officer to PMB at:

Chief, Property Management Branch
6011 Executive Boulevard, Suite 645B3
Rockville, MD 20852

What happens if my loan is approved?
If your loan, is approved your Property Custodial Officer must identify all borrowed, rented, and vendor demonstration property by attaching a tag which shows the

  • Name and address of the owner,
  • Number of loan, and
  • Starting and ending dates of the loan.

What else should I know about borrowing property?
It is also good practice to identify property owned by NIH employees with the name and address of the owner. To avoid confusion during inventories, ICs and their contractors must clearly identify any property not owned by NIH. This includes property owned by NIH employees and contractors and property loaned to NIH from outside sources.

Receiving Property

How does receiving property fit into the property lifecycle?
The property management cycle has four basic parts, planning, acquisition, management and disposal. The acquisition portion of the cycle ends with the receipt of property. The management portion of the cycle begins with the receipt of property. When property meets the requirements for control and record keeping, receiving information passes from the procurement system(s) to the property and financial management systems. Information from the receiving process becomes the initial property and financial management record. As such, receiving serves as the linchpin for several important administrative functions.